Oolong

Oolong has become popular in recent years since they contain less caffeine. They boast the largest variety in the world of teas, ranging from – depending on their degree of oxidation – a sweet flavour of flowers to the intense fragrance of ripe fruit, spices and occasionally earthy aromas. Oolong teas are produced mostly in south-eastern China and Taiwan

Bao Zhong

Pouchong, also known as Baozhong, is a very green oolong tea hailing from Taiwan. Pouchong is the most lightly oxidized of all oolongs – just 8-10%. This creates a beautiful balance of green tea freshness and heavenly floral notes found in darker oolongs. In Taiwan, pouchong tea is all about the aroma. In the cup, you’ll find a buttery sweet and uplifting floral aroma that lingers on the palate long after your last sip. It displays a soft, succulent texture and a clean, refreshing finish which complement sweet rich foods like fruits, bread with butter and even lightly seasoned delicate seafoods like scallops and lobster

Ti Kuan Yin

Ti Kuan Yin (also spelled Tieguanyin) is a legendary oolong tea from the Fujian province in China. It is one of China’s most beloved oolongs and is extremely time-consuming to produce (well over a dozen distinct steps in the processing are observed). Ti Kuan Yin produces a cup that is warm, soft and soothingly mineral in texture. Notes of toasted walnut and tender collard greens. Intriguing lingering floral aroma, lightly orchid and gentle astringency. A meditative cup, this tea pairs extremely well with most desserts, melons and meats

Da Hong Pao

Da Hong Pao or Wuyi rock tea, is a roasted oolong tea from the Wuyi mountains in Fujian province, China. The high roasting treatment gives Wuyi oolong its specific smoky and minerally character. This is a beautifully balanced and complex tea with a deep, yet faint, ripe fruitiness in the background. The flavor is slightly honey-floral and nutty, with hints of white sesame, cinnamon, and sweetened burdock root. There is a lingering sweet caramel aftertaste because of the roasting technique. It is perfect for multiple infusions so you can tease out many layers as we recommend sipping with roasted vegetables and grilled darker meats

Milk Oolong

Milk Oolong is a relatively new cultivar in the delicious world of Taiwanese teas and is prized for its inherent cream and butter notes. Lower quality versions have these notes enhanced through aromatization but the finest, true Milk Oolongs offer lightly roasted, rolled leaves that yield a light-bodied cup with sweet buttery texture and delicate floral aroma. Also called Jin Xuan or Golden Lily, it is ideal for multiple infusions and a dedicated Yixing chinese clay teapot. Beautiful on its own or enjoy it with oily and spicy foods

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